“Now What?” – WW2 Vet Recalls the Difficulties of Returning to Life in Peacetime (LISTEN)

GIs in Paris learn of Japan's surrender in 1945. After the din of the victory celebrations had faded, many service men and women would do their best to pick up their lives where they left off. It wasn't always easy. (Image source" WikiCommons)

GIs in Paris learn of Japan’s surrender in 1945. After the din of the victory celebrations had faded, many servicemen would do their best to pick up their lives where they left off. It wasn’t always easy. (Image source” WikiCommons)

“From the time I left San Francisco to the time I got back was five years and seven months. That’s a long time and lots of things had changed.”

I AM YOUNG. I am 20 years old, yet I know nothing of life but despair, death, fear, and fatuous superficiality cast over an abyss of sorrow.”

While those words were spoken by Erich Maria Remarque’s protagonist Paul Bäumer in the landmark First World War novel, All Quiet on the Western Front, they very well could have been uttered by any of the millions of American soldiers, sailors and fliers who made it home from the battlefields of Europe or the Pacific in 1945.

In this latest podcast from our friends at Audioburst.com, one Second World War vet describes the feelings of alienation and dislocation he experienced following his return to the United States after the war.

Leave a Reply