Monumental Uproar — Korean War Memorial Has Some Vets Seeing Red

Much of the arms and equipment used in the Korean War was World War Two surplus. An Ohio monument to the Cold War conflict depicts hardware from decades later.

Much of the arms and equipment used in the Korean War was World War Two surplus, but an Ohio monument to the Cold War conflict depicts hardware from decades later. Image courtesy Wikicommons. Preview image with permission of Warstuff.com.

 

There were no UH-1 Huey choppers in the Korean War. Nor were there F-16 Falcon jets or GIs in kevlar helmets and body armour for that matter.

Yet likenesses of all of these things appear in a recently unveiled monument to the 61-year-old conflict in Ross County, Ohio — and it has local military veterans up in arms.

“I think this is a worthy project… but if we’re going to do it, let’s do it right,” one retired naval officer told the Chillicothe Gazette after the memorial’s official opening earlier this week.

The granite plaque, which was made public earlier this month, has been drawing fire for its portrayal of military hardware that, in many cases, wasn’t fielded until decades after the 1950s police action. The story has since been picked up by the national media.

But images of Vietnam and Gulf War-era small arms, main battle tanks and jet fighters aren’t the only things amiss, say some locals. The tribute, which lists 18 Ross County residents who died in the fight to liberate South Korea from communism, also omits at least five names of fallen locals.

“To me, it’s so sad that people would be left off of that list,” one woman whose uncle was killed in action just days before the 1953 ceasefire told the paper.

Plans are already underway to replace the monument.

To read the full story and see the memorial for yourself, click here.

 

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